PRESS


MEET PAMELA


As one of Canada's 2015 Top 30 Under 30 Sustainability Leaders and the founder of PR Hound and Minority Women in Business Inc., Pamela Ogang is empowering one business at a time.

For all media inquiries, contact Pamela at pamela(at)prhound.com

A born entrepreneur, Pamela champions economic empowerment and the idea of business being fun and liberating. Pamela has been featured in CEO Blog Nation, Corporate Knights, The Hamilton Spectator, A Plus and Share Newspaper. She has spoken at the Toronto National Job Fair and Training Expo and GenHERation and honored at the Toronto Sustainability Speaker Series.

We're Canadian, love entrepreneurs and are SLIGHTLY obsessed with dogs.

A McGill alumnus, Claude believes that promoting your business should be easy and affordable. Claude's role as PR Hound's Chief Brand Officer includes managing our social media accounts, making sure that our subscribers receive their daily media emails and reminding us to have fun. Because of Claude, we donate 5% of our revenue to Adopt-A-Dog/Save-A-Life.

Contact Claude at hound(at)prhound.com or see what's on his mind.

We reach out to local media contacts who then send us their media requests.

Ex. "Retirement plan advisers: How do you keep retirement savers aligned with their goals?" Media contacts also submit their name, media outlet, category of request, requirements and deadline.

We aggregate media requests in a daily email sent to subscribers, Monday to Friday.

We also update our site with each new media request. PR Hound offers three subscription offers: (1) Free trail users with a three month access, (2) Monthly users and (3) Yearly users.

Subscribers simply respond to media requests that match their expertise or experience.

We provide a detailed user guide to answer all subscriber questions. Media contacts determine which responses are best suited for their story and respond to the author directly.


x REPEAT



  • December 2014 A psychic told me a hard truth

    You're anxious because you want to make money and you don't know how", said a self-proclaimed psychic two years ago at a networking event when I stupidly asked him to read me. He was right. I had to rethink everything about my life.
  • March 2015It all started with the launch of my first business

    To gain credibility for Minority Women in Business (MWB) Inc., I applied for an award and won! (I’m one of Canada’s 2015 Top 30 Under 30 Sustainability leaders.)
  • April 2015I knew that the publicity wouldn’t last forever

    A google search lead me to a free service providing journalists with a database of sources (that’s you and me) for upcoming stories and daily opportunities for sources to secure media coverage.
  • May 2015The service was great; however, some features really bugged me

    1. I wasn't sure whether I was pitching correctly
    2. I was overwhelmed with receiving three emails a day
    3. I wanted publicity locally (Toronto specifically) not predominantly in the States.
  • May 2015I thought, ”Perhaps, this is a business opportunity”

    Unfortunately, like many other dreamers, I was too afraid to pursue the idea since I had no idea where to start and if it would be worth it. I decided to focus on MWB Inc.
  • December 2015I decided to take a job at a non-profit

    At the time, I was working 12-14 hour days as a project coordinator for a Women’s entrepreneurship program at a charity (MicroSkills). (Note: I loved what I did).
  • February 2016In my job, I started to notice something interesting

    Despite completing thorough marketing plans, none of my clients were confident about PR. No matter what I said, they though that PR was only reserved for large established corporations.
  • March 2016To help my clients, I decided to give my buried idea a try.

    I knew that part of my service would have to include empowering my clients to promote themselves with confidence.
  • March 2016I saw a sign...

    I’m terrible at naming things, but I was able to come up with a name quickly and get a domain name (prhound.com).
  • March 2016 - January 2017I worked on the concept during my spare time.

I sacrificed sleep (Typically, I would wake up at 4am to work on the concept and then go to work at 8 am).
I sacrificed time with friends and family.
I gained 25 pounds (I acquired a belly for the first time in my life).
I had a few crying fits where I really questioned what I was doing.
  • February 2017I eventually burned out

    I was dying in my job and couldn’t handle the 12-14 hour days, but I was so scared to admit defeat. I handed in my resignation with trembling hands.
  • February 15, 2017Then, I saw another sign

    1 week before my last day, MicroSkills went Bankrupt (one day after Valentine's day). It was a tragedy, but I saw it as a sign to truly commit to PR Hound.
  • February - May 2017 It took me 3 months to get PR Hound ready

    I completely underestimated the time required to complete all the activities that go into starting a business. I also took the time to recover from burnout.
  • May 2017In total, it took two years of hard work

    A lot of the hard work was mental. I created PR Hound for entrepreneurs, like me, who are trying to make their dreams come true.

The following are some frequently asked questions about PR Hound.

If you have a question that is not answered here, please contact Pamela, PR Hound's founder, at pamela(at)prhound.com .

Frequently Asked Questions

1How did you come up with the name PR Hound?

Originally, we named our service "Tubby Pig" after a domain name that Pamela already owned. Our tagline was unimaginative:"bring home the bacon".

We loved Tubby Pig, but it was originally reserved for a financial blog, so we needed a new name. We knew that a good domain name was critical. We searched for a short, .com domain name and started with only one keyword PR. PR Hound came from combining random words with PR. Hound was just a fluke really.

2How did you choose Claude as your Chief Brand Officer?

We wanted our brand to fun and exciting and a dog embodies those qualities. We actually were in the process of interviewing a British Bulldog named Winston, but then we saw Claude's picture and we couldn't help ourselves.

3When did you start PR Hound?
Pamela Ogang, the founder of PR Hound, started developing PR Hound over two years ago. In February 2017, Ms. Ogang devoted her full-time to starting the business.
4How is PR Hound different from a PR agency?

The truth is PR is best done by yourself. While you can benefit from the expertise and experience of a PR firm, they will never be able to duplicate your passion. Furthermore, a PR agency are not 100% focused on you since they have multiple clients. Most PR agencies are expensive and out of reach to small business owners.

PR Hound empowers any small business owner to do PR themselves. We connect you local media contacts and give you guidance on how to become a PR expert. We pride ourselves on being accessible and affordable.

5How is PR Hound different from similar services like HARO and mediakitty?

1. We are the only service that really emphasizes local.


2. Unlike other services, we see our subscribers as more than sources, but business owners trying their best to grow their business.


3. We believe in taking the time to educate you to help you become the best marketer that you can be.

6Why and how much do you charge for your service?

We love what we do, but cannot sustain ourselves on love alone (sad face). What our subscribers pay help us live another day.

We offer three subscription packages. The only difference between each is price and duration.

1. 2-Month Free Trial

2. Pay-As-You-Go: $21.97/month

3. Friends for a Year: $199.70 (approximately $16.64/month)

7How can I become a media contact for PR Hound?
That's great! We're always looking for local journalists, bloggers or producers. It's free to sign up. Click here for more details.
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